Jesus' Comments on Darwinism

In order not to admit God, you take the paternity of a beast as your own

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Jesus' Comments on Darwinism

(CEV) "The Notebooks 1943", p. 591
Jesus says: "One of the points at which your pride founders in error -which, above all, degrades precisely your haughtiness by giving you an origin that, if you were less corrupted by pride, you would repudiate as degrading- is that of Darwin's theory.

In order not to admit God, who, in His power, was able to have created the universe from nothing and man from the already created mud, you take the paternity of a beast as your own.

Don't you realize you are diminishing yourselves, for -consider this- won't a beast -no matter how exemplary, selected, improved, and perfected in form and instinct, and, if your wish, even in mental formation- always be a beast? Don't you realize this? This testifies unfavorably regarding your pride as pseudo-supermen.

But if you fail to realize, I will not be the one to waste words to make you aware of it and converted from the error. I ask you only one question which, in your great numbers, you have never asked yourselves. And if you can answer Me with facts, I will no longer combat this degrading theory of yours.

If man is a spin-off from the monkey, which by progressive evolution has become man, how is it that over so many years in which you have maintained this theory you have never succeeded, not even with the perfected instruments and methods at present, in making a man from a monkey?

You could have taken the most intelligent offspring of a pair of intelligent moneys and then their intelligent offspring, and so on. You would now have many generations of selected, instructed monkeys cared for by the most patient, tenacious, and sagacious scientific method. But you would still have monkeys.

If there happened to be a mutation, it would be this: the beasts would be physically less strong than the former ones and morally more degenerate, for, with all your methods and instruments, you would have destroyed that perfection of the monkey which My Father created for these quadrumans.

Another question. If man came from the monkey, how is it that man, even with grafts and repugnant forms of cross-fertilization, does not become a monkey again?

You would be capable even of attempting these horrors if you knew that it could give approvative sanction to your theory.

But you do not do so because you know that you would not be able to turn a man into a monkey. You would turn him into an ugly son of man, a degenerate, perhaps a criminal. But never a real monkey.

You do not try because you know beforehand that you would get a poor result and your reputation would emerge there from in ruins. For this reason you do not do so. For no other.

For you feel no remorse or horror over degrading a man to the level of a beast to maintain a thesis of yours. You are capable of this and of much more. You are already beasts because you deny God and kill the spirit, which distinguishes you from the beasts.

Your science causes Me horror.

You degrade the intellect and like madmen do not even realize you are degrading it.

In truth, I tell you that many of the primitive are more men than you are.

 

 

 

Maria Valtorta: The Notebooks

Maria Valtorta: The Poem of The Man-God

Maria Valtorta "These Notebooks belong to a category of mystical literature which the Catholic Church has long been familiar with: that of so-called “private revelations." A private revelation is not binding for the faith of Christians, but its value is to be measured by its capacity to instruct and inflame souls, spurring them to love God more and apply divine teachings to their everyday lives. In the confidence—and the conviction—that this work superabounds in these inspired qualities, we offer it for the spiritual nourishment of readers. —David Murray

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